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Chart 1. US biomass-based diesel market, 2003-2018 “Diesel propulsion deserves wider considera Ɵon by fleet managers across the country,” Schwegman said. “With biodiesel producƟon and retail distribuƟon expanding, and so many proven benefits, we believe more fleets will embrace the technology as part of their sustainability plans.” Breakout sessions focused on various topics, from how biodiesel actually makes food cheaper by decreasing the price of protein due to an outlet for leŌover oil and fat, to examining California’s thriving but complex low carbon market. Jennifer Case, New Leaf Biofuels in San Diego where the conference was held, shared that in 2006, 2 million gallons of biodiesel was produced in California. In fiscal year 2016, 360 million gallons of biomassbased diesel (which includes renewable diesel) was consumed in the state, double the amount just two years prior. Of that amount, 142 million gallons were biodiesel, almost five percent of the state’s total diesel consumpƟon. As the sixth largest economy in the world, California and its climate change legislaƟon are on the radar of the biodiesel and renewable diesel industry. The state’s cap and trade program, which is now considered a tax, officially expires in 2020 unless the legislature takes acƟon. California has appropriated $3.4 billion in cap and trade aucƟon proceeds to reduce emissions by funding transit and high speed rail, affordable housing near jobs and schools, forest and watershed improvements, healthy soils, recycling opportuniƟes, and home energy upgrades. Of the $2.1 billion earmarked for 2017-2018, $363 million is slated for reducƟon of petroleum use by 50 percent. Ryan Lamberg, California Biodiesel IniƟaƟve, explained the various standards, regulaƟons, and plans put in place to reduce the state’s greenhouse gas emissions – most of which comes from transportaƟon – 40 percent by 2030. He showed that of the low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) credits generated in California in fiscal year 2015-2016, 41 percent was from ethanol, 20 percent came from biodiesel, and 22 percent was from renewable diesel. The LCFS projected volumes for Devon Ronsse, a junior at Kansas State University, presents his waste vegetable oil dryer unit project at the Next Generation Scientists for Biodiesel poster session. The unit reduces water content in used cooking oil biomass-based diesel use shows substanƟal growth, from nearly 600 million gallons in 2022 to 1.2 billion gallons by 2024 and 1.6 billion gallons by 2030. One of the more popular sessions was a look ahead at the Environmental ProtecƟon Agency (EPA) and its RFS program. Paul Argyropoulos of EPA, appearing via videoconference due to the presidenƟal inauguraƟon acƟviƟes in Washington, DC, confirmed that the RFS volume obligaƟon rules are complex, but assured the industry the agency is on track and already working on the 2018 and beyond volume requirements. He said EPA anƟcipates having a very busy year with the new Trump administraƟon. “We have a lot before us, but we look forward to conƟnually working with you,” Argyropoulos told the audience. Larry Shafer, Playmaker Strategies, reported that since July 2010 when the current RFS went into effect, US biomass-based diesel consumpƟon has increased by 900 percent to 2.9 billion gallons in 2016 (see chart 1 above). Continued on page 12 collected from the school’s dining halls. Anne Steckel, NBB Federal Affairs, discusses the increasing need to work with lawmakers. www.rendermagazine.com Render February 2017 11


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